Topics

Preparation

Collectively the Consortium’s members operate various materials’ fabrication facilities and provide access to state-of- the-art sample preparation techniques, the result of long established collaboration work and specialization.

Collectively the Consortium’s members operate various materials’ fabrication facilities and provide access to state-of- the-art sample preparation techniques, the result of long established collaboration work and specialization. Some of the Consortium’s strengths are the synthesis- and advanced characterization of nanomaterials, their integration in prototype devices and device testing, particularly in the field of renewable energy.

Microscopy

Advanced spectromicroscopy techniques by means of aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with high angular annular dark field (HAADF) detector and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS).

Advanced spectromicroscopy techniques by means of aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with high angular annular dark field (HAADF) detector and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) are key techniques to probe locally the nanoscale structural and electronic modifications. To study with atomic precision, the crystalline structure, composition of material bulk and interface with resolved real-space imaging and spectroscopy.

Characterization

Exchange coupled double layers based on rare earth- transition metal ferrimagnets have been shown to have very large exchange bias. The fields needed for their saturation can easily exceed several Teslas.

Exchange coupled double layers based on rare earth- transition metal ferrimagnets have been shown to have very large exchange bias. The fields needed for their saturation can easily exceed several Teslas. Understanding how these systems revert microscopically, is a crucial step toward employing these systems for high field devices of micron size and below. We use vacuum non-contact MFM to obtain quantitative measures of the stray fields at different applied fields, from 0 to 7 Teslas. The reversal of the ferromagnetic layer coupled to the ferrimagnet is unusual, in that the high Zeeman energy domains revert through the formation of isolated reversing regions comprising a high energy interfacial, in-plane domain walls. The onset of these reversing regions can be controlled by reducing the interlayer coupling.